Difficult Week

Malachi

Malachi

This has been one of those all consuming weeks.

  • Hope’s teacher wrote home, inquiring if, perhaps, Hope had missed her meds. (She hadn’t) She isn’t raging, but her temper tantrums are still epic, and she is still not safe.
  • GB switched therapists, as planned. She said goodbye to the therapist in the Little City that she shared with Hope. She started with her new therapist. The goal is that GB be able to express her needs verbally in “I” statements. She did much better than I expected.
  • GB and MK had a session together with the family dynamics therapist. I haven’t seen any changes in their interactions.
  • Malachi is still struggling. I enlisted the help of his other grandfather to get Booboo to agree to two days a week in a therapeutic preschool. I do not know yet how successful that was.
  • The Dad realized this week that on his retirement income we can’t afford to live in our current house; at least not while subsidizing J and MK. Duh.
  • We have been consciously cutting costs. We had already started our Food Diet- buying only food in it’s natural state, which helps not only our bodies, but our grocery bills.
  • The Dad started talking to MK about how we would be able to help her, now that we have much less money to live on. She flipped out. She has calmed down, but isn’t ready to explore her options. The Dad is confident MK will be cooperative.
  • I am busy with my new virtual filing cabinet. I finally have it usable and have started filing both girls school records in it. A paper free life sounds delicious!
  • Our rescheduled appointment with Hope’s new therapist is Monday. Unfortunately, it conflicts with my appointment with the neurologist. The neurologist needs to be rescheduled.
  • Hope is saying goodbye to the therapist in the Little City this morning. She is unhappy about having to change.
  • As I am switching to a paper free life, I realize there is a lot of other stuff clutter we do not need. Minimalists may be on to something!

This morning’s conclusion

  • My 29 year old son called yesterday. He was manic and made little sense.
  • Hope had a bad day in school, but came home and had a good a good afternoon and evening. 
  • GB came off the bus with her lip bleeding. It bled through paper towels, tissues, and a face cloth with ice. By the time it stopped, GB was  on another planet dysregulated… nasty, throwing things, paranoid.
  • GB self-regulated by putting her weighted vest on, going to her room and listening to her ipod. When she was regulated, she came down and give individual apologies to each person she had been nasty to, including Hope.
  • After she was regulated, GB managed to do her homework without any intervention.
  • Hope had a hard morning today… she wouldn’t dress until I told her I was driving them to school today and if she wanted to go in her birthday suit, I was okay with that. She didn’t know what a birthday suit was, but after I explained she got dressed quickly.
  • This morning’s conclusion: The most important thing you can teach your child is how to manage their disabilities/mental illness. I wish I had known that when J was growing up.